Is Journalistic Truth Dead? Measuring How Informed Voters Are about Political News

56 Pages Posted: 20 May 2020 Last revised: 1 Jul 2021

See all articles by Charles Angelucci

Charles Angelucci

MIT Sloan

Andrea Prat

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Date Written: June 30, 2021

Abstract

How many voters are informed about political news mainstream journalists consider important? We develop a methodology that combines a protocol for identifying major news stories, online surveys, and the estimation of a model that disentangles individual information precision from news story salience and partisanship. We focus on news about U.S. politics in a monthly sample of 1,000 voters repeated 8 times. On average, 85% of individuals are able to distinguish the major real news story of the month from fake news. 59% of individuals confidently believe this news story to be true, 39% are uncertain, and 3% confidently believe it to be false. Our results indicate that the starkest pattern about the ability of voters to identify major news stories is not the generalized death of truth or its ideological polarization but rather its unequal distribution along socioeconomic lines.

JEL Classification: L82

Suggested Citation

Angelucci, Charles and Prat, Andrea, Is Journalistic Truth Dead? Measuring How Informed Voters Are about Political News (June 30, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3593002 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3593002

Charles Angelucci (Contact Author)

MIT Sloan ( email )

100 Main Street
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States

Andrea Prat

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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