Labor Markets and Cultural Values: Evidence from Japanese and American Views About Caregiving Immigrants

37 Pages Posted: 17 May 2020

See all articles by Margaret Peters

Margaret Peters

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Political Science

Rieko Kage

University of Tokyo - Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Frances Rosenbluth

Yale University

Seiki Tanaka

University of Leeds

Date Written: November 2019

Abstract

One overlooked reason for the persistence of distinct cultural values across rich democracies, we argue, is a country's labor market structure. Parents seeking to position their children for long‐term success would do well to instill values consistent with requirements of the labor market in the country where their children are likely to work. To the extent that labor markets are fluid, as in the United States, parents should teach their children to be resourceful and creative. In countries like Japan with relatively rigid labor markets, where workers have one chance to land a long‐term contract with a leading company, parents instead should instill the values of hard work and respect for authority. We find evidence consistent with this argument in survey experiments about attitudes in the United States and Japan about the desirability of employing immigrants for care work, and what values the immigrant care workers should hold. We also find evidence of indirect norm creation. American and Japanese respondents prefer immigrants—not just caregiving immigrants—whose values align with their country's type of valued human capital.

Keywords: culture, immigration, women's labor force participation, labor market structure

Suggested Citation

Peters, Margaret and Kage, Rieko and Rosenbluth, Frances and Tanaka, Seiki, Labor Markets and Cultural Values: Evidence from Japanese and American Views About Caregiving Immigrants (November 2019). Economics & Politics, Vol. 31, Issue 3, pp. 428-464, 2019, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3598395 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecpo.12140

Margaret Peters (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Political Science ( email )

Loas Angeles, CA
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.maggiepeters.com

Rieko Kage

University of Tokyo - Graduate School of Arts and Sciences ( email )

3-8-1 Komaba
Meguro-ku
Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902
Japan

Frances Rosenbluth

Yale University

New Haven, CT 06520
United States

Seiki Tanaka

University of Leeds ( email )

School of Politics and International Studies
Leeds, LS2 9JT
United Kingdom

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