Cigarette Taxes and Smoking in the Long Run

34 Pages Posted: 19 May 2020

See all articles by Andrew Friedson

Andrew Friedson

University of Colorado at Denver - Department of Economics

Daniel I. Rees

University of Colorado Denver; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Abstract

Researchers have focused on the contemporaneous relationship between cigarette taxes and smoking, while the longer-run effects of cigarette taxes have received little attention. Using individual-level panel data from 1970-2017, we estimate the effects of cigarette taxes experienced as a teenager on smoking later in life. We find that a one-dollar increase in the cigarette tax experienced between the ages of 12 and 17 is associated with substantial reductions in smoking participation and intensity among adults in their 20s through mid-60s. Among first-time mothers, it is associated with a reduction in the likelihood of smoking the year of giving birth.

Keywords: smoking, cigarette taxes, long run

JEL Classification: H2, I10, I12

Suggested Citation

Friedson, Andrew and Rees, Daniel I., Cigarette Taxes and Smoking in the Long Run. IZA Discussion Paper No. 13252. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3602428

Andrew Friedson (Contact Author)

University of Colorado at Denver - Department of Economics ( email )

Campus Box 181
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
United States

Daniel I. Rees

University of Colorado Denver ( email )

Campus Box 181
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80218
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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