Was the Mid-2000s Drop in the British Job Change Rate Genuine or a Survey Design Effect?

12 Pages Posted: 23 May 2020

See all articles by Stephen P. Jenkins

Stephen P. Jenkins

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Social Policy and Administration; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); University of Essex - Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER)

Abstract

The year-on-year job change rate fell sharply, from 18% in 2005 to around 13% in 2006, according to British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) estimates. This fall coincides with the introduction of dependent interviewing to the BHPS, intended to reduce measurement error and improve consistency. Estimates from models of job change misclassification rates (Hausman et al., Journal of Econometrics, 1998) show that reduced measurement error cannot account for the fall in the job change rate. This suggests that the fall was genuine.

Keywords: job change, misclassification error, dependent interviewing, feed forward

JEL Classification: J62, C25, C81

Suggested Citation

Jenkins, Stephen P., Was the Mid-2000s Drop in the British Job Change Rate Genuine or a Survey Design Effect?. IZA Discussion Paper No. 13272, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3608521

Stephen P. Jenkins (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Social Policy and Administration ( email )

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

P.O. Box 7240
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University of Essex - Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) ( email )

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