Taxation as a Site of Memory: Exemptions, Universities, and the Legacy of Slavery

73 SMU Law Review Forum 222 (2020)

10 Pages Posted: 26 May 2020 Last revised: 28 Aug 2020

Date Written: May 23, 2020

Abstract

Many universities around the United States are attempting to grapple with their direct and indirect involvement with the institution of slavery. Lolita Buckner Inniss’s book The Princeton Fugitive Slave: the Trials of James Collins Johnson (2019) enters directly into the conversation taking place on university campuses and nation-wide about what responsibilities institutions have to acknowledge their past and to create racially inclusive campuses in the twenty-first century. Because most universities are tax-exempt, it is important to understand that their activities are indirectly subsidized by local, state and federal governments. The lens of tax law facilitates better understanding of universities’ unique historic role in American economic activity as well as contemporary arguments about their obligations to workers and community constituents during the COVID-19 crisis.

Keywords: taxation, slavery, princteon, Inniss

JEL Classification: K1

Suggested Citation

Crawford, Bridget J., Taxation as a Site of Memory: Exemptions, Universities, and the Legacy of Slavery (May 23, 2020). 73 SMU Law Review Forum 222 (2020), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3608833 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3608833

Bridget J. Crawford (Contact Author)

Pace University School of Law ( email )

78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY 10603
United States

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