Transportation Infrastructure in the Us

48 Pages Posted: 2 Jun 2020 Last revised: 8 Jun 2020

See all articles by Matthew Turner

Matthew Turner

Brown University - Department of Economics

Gilles Duranton

University of Pennsylvania - Real Estate Department

Geetika Nagpal

Brown University

Date Written: May 2020

Abstract

Support for massive investments in transportation infrastructure, possibly with a change in the share of spending on transit, seems widespread. Such proposals are often motivated by the belief that our infrastructure is crumbling, that infrastructure causes economic growth, that current funding regimes disadvantage rural drivers at the expense of urban public transit, or that capacity expansions will reduce congestion. In fact, most US transportation infrastructure is not deteriorating and the existing scientific literature does not show that infrastructure creates growth or reduces congestion. However, current annual expenditure on public transit buses exceeds that on interstate construction and maintenance. A careful examination of how funding is allocated across modes is suggested by the evidence. Massive new expenditures are not.

Institutional subscribers to the NBER working paper series, and residents of developing countries may download this paper without additional charge at www.nber.org.

Suggested Citation

Turner, Matthew and Duranton, Gilles and Nagpal, Geetika, Transportation Infrastructure in the Us (May 2020). NBER Working Paper No. w27254, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3615450

Matthew Turner (Contact Author)

Brown University - Department of Economics ( email )

64 Waterman Street
Providence, RI 02912
United States

Gilles Duranton

University of Pennsylvania - Real Estate Department ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104-6330
United States

Geetika Nagpal

Brown University

Box 1860
Providence, RI 02912
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
7
Abstract Views
53
PlumX Metrics