Framing the Challenges of Digital Inclusion for Young Canadians

in Dubois, E. and Martin-Bariteau, F. (eds.), Citizenship in a Connected Canada: A Research and Policy Agenda, Ottawa, ON: University of Ottawa Press, 2020

21 Pages Posted: 1 Jul 2020 Last revised: 5 Nov 2020

See all articles by leslie shade

leslie shade

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jane Bailey

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section

Jacquelyn Burkell

Faculty of Information and Media Studies

Priscilla M. Regan

George Mason University - Schar School of Policy and Government

Valerie Steeves

University of Ottawa - Criminology

Date Written: June 5, 2020

Abstract

This chapter reports on The eQuality Project’s initial findings from focus groups conducted in Fall 2018 and Winter 2019 with a diversity of youth (ages 13–17) in three Canadian cities about their perspectives and experiences of privacy and equality in networked spaces. Focus groups explored online activities and platforms used by participants, whether and how privacy was an essential aspect to their enjoyment, online experiences where they felt unwelcome or disrespected, and their strategies to mitigate these constraints. We use a modified version of the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ digital inclusion framework to link the perspectives and apprehensions of the young people we interviewed to emerging digital policy questions. These include access (availability, affordability, inclusive design, and public access), application (across various sectors and uses like education, workplaces, employment, economic development, health, public safety, and civic engagement), and adoption (uptake and relevance, privacy and data rights, safety, and digital literacy). We conclude with several policy suggestions, including holding platform companies accountable and transparent about their data collection and privacy protection practises through producing coherent and well-designed terms of service; ensuring funding for enriched digital literacy programming for schools, parents, and young people in order to strengthen digital skills and knowledge about the dynamic nature of datafication; and bringing the voices of diverse Canadian youth into policymaking to ensure that intersectional perspectives and digital justice are core components for a rights-respecting networked environment.

Suggested Citation

shade, leslie and Bailey, Jane and Burkell, Jacquelyn and Regan, Priscilla M. and Steeves, Valerie, Framing the Challenges of Digital Inclusion for Young Canadians (June 5, 2020). in Dubois, E. and Martin-Bariteau, F. (eds.), Citizenship in a Connected Canada: A Research and Policy Agenda, Ottawa, ON: University of Ottawa Press, 2020, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3620515

Leslie Shade (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jane Bailey

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, K1N 6N5
Canada
613-562-5800 ext. 2364 (Phone)
613-562-5124 (Fax)

Jacquelyn Burkell

Faculty of Information and Media Studies ( email )

FIMS and Nursing Building, Rm. 2050
London, Ontario N6A 5B9
Canada
5q9-661-2111 ext 88506 (Phone)

Priscilla M. Regan

George Mason University - Schar School of Policy and Government ( email )

4400 University Drive
MSN 3F4
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States

Valerie Steeves

University of Ottawa - Criminology ( email )

25 University Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5
Canada
(613) 562-5800 ext. 1793 (Phone)
(613) 562-5304 (Fax)

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