UN Peacekeeping As Intervention by Invitation. Host State Consent and the Use of Force in Security Council-Mandated Stabilization Operations

Journal on the Use of Force and International Law (2020)

37 Pages Posted: 7 Jul 2020

See all articles by Patryk I. Labuda

Patryk I. Labuda

Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Legal Studies

Date Written: June 11, 2020

Abstract

Contemporary UN peacekeeping missions often have Chapter VII mandates and wide authorizations to use force, notably to protect civilians. Since 2010, however, the Security Council has created a new generation of stabilization missions to support host governments. Peacekeepers in these missions are expected not only to protect civilians but also to combat armed groups, sometimes jointly with state security forces. While this may seem like just the next step in the UN’s gradual drift from traditional to robust peacekeeping, this article argues that stabilization constitutes a more radical departure from conventional doctrines on the use of force by peacekeepers. In fact, stabilization should be understood as a distinct form of UN-mandated intervention by invitation.

Keywords: peacekeeping, use of force, Chapter VII, collective security, stabilization

Suggested Citation

Labuda, Patryk I., UN Peacekeeping As Intervention by Invitation. Host State Consent and the Use of Force in Security Council-Mandated Stabilization Operations (June 11, 2020). Journal on the Use of Force and International Law (2020), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3624957

Patryk I. Labuda (Contact Author)

Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Legal Studies ( email )

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