Love as Justice

The Langston Hughes Review, vol. 26, no. 1, 2020, pp. 49–76.

30 Pages Posted: 21 Dec 2020

See all articles by Lua K. Yuille

Lua K. Yuille

University of Kansas School of Law

Ruhiyyih Yuille

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Justin Yuille

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2020

Abstract

The law, serving as a codification of the commitments and values of “White space,” often treats love and justice as separable and separate values, experiences, and institutions. Black love, on the contrary, is bound up with and, even, identified with justice. This inextricability is painted masterfully in the interstices of Zora Neale Hurston’s, Their Eyes Were Watching God. The story, widely framed as a woman’s journey to autonomy and love, is just as much the story of her search for justice. This article uses Hurston’s narrative of love and justice, Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy of humanization, and law to illustrate the implications of Black love for engaging legal justice in White space. It concludes that liberation for Black people demands humanizing legal praxis.

Keywords: Paulo Freire, Critical Pedagogy, Zora Neale Hurston, Law, Black Love, Race

Suggested Citation

Yuille, Lua Kamal and Yuille, Ruhiyyih and Yuille, Justin, Love as Justice (2020). The Langston Hughes Review, vol. 26, no. 1, 2020, pp. 49–76., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3626202

Lua Kamal Yuille (Contact Author)

University of Kansas School of Law ( email )

Green Hall
1535 W. 15th Street
Lawrence, KS 66045-7577
United States

Ruhiyyih Yuille

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Justin Yuille

affiliation not provided to SSRN

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