Do Immigrants Pay a Price When Marrying Natives? Lessons from the US Time Use Survey

52 Pages Posted: 15 Jun 2020 Last revised: 4 Mar 2021

See all articles by Shoshana Amyra Grossbard

Shoshana Amyra Grossbard

San Diego State University - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Victoria Vernon

State University of New York - Empire State College

Abstract

Using the American Time Use Survey for the years 2003-18 we compare the allocation of time of native men and women married to immigrants with that of their counterparts in all-native couples. We find that when intermarried to a native some immigrant women pay an assimilation price to the extent that, compared to native women in all-native marriages, they work longer hours at paid work, household chores or both, while their husbands do no extra work. In some cases they work an extra hour per day. Immigrant men don't pay such price. Some work 34 minutes less at household chores than native men in all-native marriages, while the native women who marry immigrant men seem to pay a price relatively to what their situation would be in an all-native marriage. An explanation based on the operation of competitive marriage markets works for immigrant women but not for immigrant men. Traditional gender-based privileges may allow immigrant men to prevent native women from capturing a price for the value that intermarriage generates for their husbands. Such 'male dominance' scenario also helps explain why immigrant men married to native daughters of immigrants from the same region get more benefits from intermarriage than other immigrants.

Keywords: time use, immigration, household production, intermarriage, marriage market

JEL Classification: D13, J12, J22

Suggested Citation

Grossbard, Shoshana and Vernon, Victoria, Do Immigrants Pay a Price When Marrying Natives? Lessons from the US Time Use Survey. IZA Discussion Paper No. 13340, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3627041

Shoshana Grossbard (Contact Author)

San Diego State University - Department of Economics ( email )

5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

Victoria Vernon

State University of New York - Empire State College ( email )

325 Hudston st, office 525
New York, NY 10013
United States

HOME PAGE: http://vvernon.sunyempirefaculty.net

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