The Preference for Moderation Scale

78 Pages Posted: 1 Aug 2020

See all articles by Aimee Drolet

Aimee Drolet

UCLA Anderson School

Mary Frances Luce

Duke University, The Fuqua School of Business

Li Jiang

George Washington University - Department of Marketing

Benjamin Rossi

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Reid Hastie

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business

Date Written: July 1, 2020

Abstract

We propose that individual differences in the value placed on the principle of moderation exist and influence many aspects of consumer decision-making. The idea that moderation is an important guiding norm of human behavior is prevalent throughout history and an explicit theme in many philosophies, religions, and cultures. Yet, moderation has not been studied as an individual-level determinant of consumer behavior. We develop a scale that measures the degree to which individuals have a Preference for Moderation (PFM). The PFM scale predicts consequential behavior in many decision contexts. We first report on scale development, including the generation and selection of items. We then report analyses that show PFM is distinct from several popular individual-difference variables. Related to cultural background, PFM reliably predicts the use of compromise (Study 1) and balancing (vs. highlighting) strategies (Study 2), as well as various decision-making behaviors, including reliance on the representativeness heuristic (Study 3), self-reported financial habits and outcomes (Studies 4-5), real-world online reviewing behavior (Study 6), and split-ticket voting behavior in the 2018 U.S. midterm elections (Study 7).

Keywords: moderation, choice, individual difference scale

JEL Classification: D01, D03, M31

Suggested Citation

Drolet, Aimee and Luce, Mary Frances and Jiang, Li and Rossi, Benjamin and Hastie, Reid, The Preference for Moderation Scale (July 1, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3642793 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3642793

Aimee Drolet (Contact Author)

UCLA Anderson School ( email )

Los Angeles, CA
United States
3107708160 (Phone)

Mary Frances Luce

Duke University, The Fuqua School of Business ( email )

100 Fuqua Drive
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States
919-360-9975 (Phone)

Li Jiang

George Washington University - Department of Marketing ( email )

United States

Benjamin Rossi

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Reid Hastie

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )

5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
83
Abstract Views
362
rank
358,346
PlumX Metrics