Predictability and the Logic of Perceived Appropriateness: How Expressed Emotions Influence Trust

Posted: 6 Aug 2020

See all articles by Polly Kang

Polly Kang

Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)

Maurice E. Schweitzer

University of Pennsylvania - Operations & Information Management Department

Date Written: July 8, 2020

Abstract

Across eight studies, we describe how emotional expressions interact with contextual cues to signal benevolent predictability and influence trust. We identify context as an important moderator of the relationship between emotional expressions and trust. Absent contextual cues, negative emotional expressions harm trust, but negative emotional expressions that are congruent with contextual cues boost trust. Similarly, happy expressions boost trust when they are accompanied by joyful contextual cues, but not by sad, angry, or neutral cues; angry expressions boost trust when they are accompanied by angry contextual cues, but by not joyful or neutral cues; sad emotional expressions boost trust when they are accompanied by sad contextual cues, but not by joyful or neutral cues. In linking emotional expressions and trust, we develop a theoretical framework that incorporates the logic of appropriateness and benevolent predictability to broaden our understanding of the antecedents of trust.

Keywords: Trust, Emotions, Affect

Suggested Citation

Kang, Polly and Schweitzer, Maurice E., Predictability and the Logic of Perceived Appropriateness: How Expressed Emotions Influence Trust (July 8, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3647279

Polly Kang (Contact Author)

Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania) ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States
19104 (Fax)

Maurice E. Schweitzer

University of Pennsylvania - Operations & Information Management Department ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States
215-898-4776 (Phone)
215-898-3664 (Fax)

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