Redressing Historical Responsibility for the Precarities of Climate Change in the Present

Benoît Mayer & Alexander Zahar (eds), Debating Climate Law (forthcoming)

20 Pages Posted:

See all articles by Sarah Mason-Case

Sarah Mason-Case

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law; Harvard University - Institute for Global Law and Policy

Julia Dehm

La Trobe Law School

Date Written: July 22, 2020

Abstract

This chapter is part of a volume on debating the law of climate change and thus assumes the style of legal debate. We argue that industrialized countries of the Global North are responsible for historical emissions that contribute to the unjust precarities of climate change in the present for states in the Global South, the poor, and Black, Indigenous and other marginalized peoples in settler colonial states. First, relying on international legal doctrine, we show how the 'no harm' rule of customary international law provides one avenue of recourse. Nevertheless, we also argue that this avenue is limited because international law reflects social reality and states, companies and institutions of the Global North have power to shape the law to the detriment of others. We therefore undertake an immanent critique of international legal doctrines drawing on critical traditions, including critical race theories and Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL). We expose the internal contradictions in the law that preclude full repair for historical injustices. We also expose that international law's inability to redress the problem at hand stems from climate change's imbrication with broader histories of dispossession, including colonialism and its reincarnations in the global political economy. We therefore argue for alternatives to obtain redress. We call for "reparations" that would look to marginalized peoples for means and ends to fully decolonize the international legal order and to re-envision social relations among peoples that could also address climate harms.

Keywords: climate justice; reparations; international law; immanent critique; critical race theory; Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL)

Suggested Citation

Mason-Case, Sarah and Dehm, Julia, Redressing Historical Responsibility for the Precarities of Climate Change in the Present (July 22, 2020). Benoît Mayer & Alexander Zahar (eds), Debating Climate Law (forthcoming), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=

Sarah Mason-Case (Contact Author)

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law ( email )

78 and 84 Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2C5
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://bit.ly/2wfif9S

Harvard University - Institute for Global Law and Policy ( email )

1575 Massachusetts
Hauser 406
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Julia Dehm

La Trobe Law School ( email )

Department of Economics and Finance
Victoria 3552, 3086
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/law/staff/profile?uname=JDehm

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