Change-Point Analysis of Cyberbullying-Related Twitter Discussions During COVID-19

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Social Informatics Research Symposium (“Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges”) in Conjunction with the 83rd Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T), 2020.

12 Pages Posted: 11 Aug 2020

See all articles by Sanchari Das

Sanchari Das

University of Denver

Andrew Kim

Indiana University Bloomington

Sayar Karmakar

University of Florida

Date Written: August 7, 2020

Abstract

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, users are increasingly turning to online services. An increase in social media usage has also been observed, leading to the suspicion that this has also raised cyberbullying. In this initial work, we explore the possibility of an increase in cyberbullying incidents due to the pandemic and high social media usage. To evaluate this trend, we collected 454,046 cyberbullying-related public tweets posted between January 1st, 2020 - June 7th, 2020. We summarize the tweets containing multiple keywords into their daily counts. Our analysis showed the existence of at most one statistically significant changepoint for most of these keywords, which were primarily located around the end of March. Almost all these changepoint time-locations can be attributed to COVID-19, which substantiates our initial hypothesis of an increase in cyberbullying through analysis of discussions over Twitter.

Keywords: twitter, cyberbullying, social media, time series, change-point, COVID-19, pandemic

Suggested Citation

Das, Sanchari and Kim, Andrew and Karmakar, Sayar, Change-Point Analysis of Cyberbullying-Related Twitter Discussions During COVID-19 (August 7, 2020). Proceedings of the 16th Annual Social Informatics Research Symposium (“Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges”) in Conjunction with the 83rd Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T), 2020., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3669400

Sanchari Das (Contact Author)

University of Denver ( email )

2201 S. Gaylord St
Denver, CO 80208-2685
United States

Andrew Kim

Indiana University Bloomington ( email )

Dept of Biology
100 South Indiana Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Sayar Karmakar

University of Florida ( email )

PO Box 117165, 201 Stuzin Hall
Gainesville, FL 32610-0496
United States

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