Questioning the Legitimacy of Corporate Codes of Conduct as Instruments to Regulate B2B Relations: A Precarious Balance Between States and Multinational Corporations

25 Pages Posted: 11 Aug 2020

See all articles by Sarah Di Martino

Sarah Di Martino

King's College London - The Dickson Poon School of Law

Date Written: August 11, 2020

Abstract

In light of the new current global governance scenario where Multinational Corporations are seen as quasi-state entities able to replace governments in their role as public regulators, the paper questions the legitimacy of Corporate Codes of Conduct (CCOCs) as instruments to regulate business-to-business relations. Notably, the company-centric formation process, together with their strategic contractual and neo-colonialist instrumentalization, makes CCOCs capable of passing responsibility for societal issues to the lower tiers of their supply chains. Against this background, the thesis calls for the public regulator to retake their role as public power in charge of addressing societal and environmental global issues.

Keywords: Global governance, global societal concerns, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Codes of Conduct, B2B relations, legitimacy, distributional effects, neocolonialism

Suggested Citation

Di Martino, Sarah, Questioning the Legitimacy of Corporate Codes of Conduct as Instruments to Regulate B2B Relations: A Precarious Balance Between States and Multinational Corporations (August 11, 2020). TLI Think! Paper 19/2020, King's College London Law School Research Paper Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3671535 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3671535

Sarah Di Martino (Contact Author)

King's College London - The Dickson Poon School of Law ( email )

Somerset House East Wing
Strand
London, WC2R 2LS
United Kingdom

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