Gender, Job Satisfaction and Quits: A Generational Comparison

34 Pages Posted: 29 Sep 2020

See all articles by Benjamin Artz

Benjamin Artz

University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh - College of Business

Date Written: August 12, 2020

Abstract

Job satisfaction has a significant and negative impact on voluntary job quits that may vary in size by gender. If women are more likely than men to quit dissatisfying jobs and therefore interrupt their careers, then gender gaps in earnings, labor force participation and leadership roles may persist. However, the improvement of these gender gaps over time may reflect a convergence between genders in how job satisfaction affects quit decisions. Using panel data comprised of two cohorts of similarly aged workers in the US, women’s quit behavior in the past was significantly more responsive to job satisfaction than men’s quit behavior. Yet, this gender difference vanished over time. Fixed effects estimations and robustness checks confirm these results.

Keywords: gender, job satisfaction, quit, separations

JEL Classification: J16, J28, J63

Suggested Citation

Artz, Benjamin, Gender, Job Satisfaction and Quits: A Generational Comparison (August 12, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3672571 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3672571

Benjamin Artz (Contact Author)

University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh - College of Business ( email )

United States

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