Commercial Success and Creativity: A Resource Dependence View

50 Pages Posted: 21 Aug 2020

See all articles by Prashant Shukla

Prashant Shukla

Accenture

Andrew von Nordenflycht

Simon Fraser University (SFU) - Beedie School of Business; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management

Date Written: September 1, 2015

Abstract

Does commercial success diminish creativity? With arguments both for and against, the question remains one the biggest of puzzles in the study of creativity. In this paper, using novel measures of creativity and success, we identify the causal impact of success on subsequent levels of creativity. While exploration/exploitation framework predicts an increase in exploitation (lower creativity) after success a resource dependence perspective points out that commercial success might facilitate greater creative risk-taking by enhancing access to important complementary resources. We find that creativity decreases after commercial success. More specifically, creativity risk goes down by a 1/3 standard deviation after a successful movie. Creativity does not go down for filmmakers with family connections in the industry because they are disproportionately more likely to retain their popularity and access to financial and other resources than directors without such connections. We conclude with the methodological and theoretical contributions of the study and discuss its implications on policy and practice for creativity and innovation management.

Keywords: creativity, innovation commercial success, resource dependence theory, family businesses

Suggested Citation

Shukla, Prashant and von Nordenflycht, Andrew, Commercial Success and Creativity: A Resource Dependence View (September 1, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3677480 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3677480

Prashant Shukla (Contact Author)

Accenture ( email )

Dublin
Ireland

Andrew Von Nordenflycht

Simon Fraser University (SFU) - Beedie School of Business ( email )

8888 University Drive
Burnaby, British Colombia V5A 1S6
Canada

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management ( email )

100 Main Street
E62-416
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States

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