Alleviating An Unequal COVID-19 World: Globally Digital and Productively Healthy

Proceedings of the Unequal World Conference: On Human Development, United Nations, New York, New York, September 28-29 (2020)

Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 3679351

Posted: 15 Oct 2020 Last revised: 16 Oct 2020

See all articles by Julia M. Puaschunder

Julia M. Puaschunder

Harvard University; New School for Social Research; Columbia University; Princeton University; George Washington University Center for International Business Education and Research; The New School - Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (CEPA)

Martin Gelter

Fordham University School of Law; European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

Siegfried Sharma

Graz University of Technology

Date Written: August 23, 2020

Abstract

The novel Coronavirus-crisis raises attention to digitalization and healthcare prevention that opens opportunities to alleviate growing online and healthcare inequalities.

In the wake of an already burgeoning digitalization revolution, the COVID-19 pandemic perpetuated digitalization. As affinity to information and communication technologies nowadays determines economic potential, technology-based inequality increases. Taxing digital analytics-driven economic growth could raise funds to offset technology disruption fallouts on a national level. On a global scale, equal access to internet connectivity around the world would help spread the benefits of digitalization equally and aid countries in catching up in international development endeavors.

More than ever before in the history of modern workforce do employers and employees alike nowadays care about the overall well-being and physical interaction in a hygienic environment. The COVID-19 pandemic steered individuals to adopt technology to self-monitor healthy lifestyles, but also governments and employers to electronically track individuals for health safety purposes. With the overall immune system resiliency determining the severity of a COVID-19 infection, preventive healthcare implementation can be leveraged into a competitive advantage. Corporate Social Responsibility and corporate governance should incentivize preventive self-care as an innovative precautionary mean for lowering pandemic outbreak risks and boosting performance. Like in the Austrian Sozialpartnerschafts-model, stakeholder integration into corporate decision making could aid in reaching collective goals of a healthy workforce in an overall precautionary environment. Online healthcare technology offers most novel corporate governance and employer-employee interaction opportunities. Endogenous growth theory should include the workforce health status as a productive labor capital driver. Precaution should be factored in as a positive collective learning-by-preventing process, which includes group dynamics around hygiene but also monitoring of one’s own and other’s health status and care via health apps that also allow tracking human contact touchpoints for preventing COVID.

Keywords: Coronavirus, Corporate Social Responsibility, COVID-19, digitalization, healthcare, inequality, international development, innovation, learning-by-preventing, lockdowns, economic growth theory, preventive healthcare, workforce, human capital

Suggested Citation

Puaschunder, Julia M. and Gelter, Martin and Sharma, Siegfried, Alleviating An Unequal COVID-19 World: Globally Digital and Productively Healthy (August 23, 2020). Proceedings of the Unequal World Conference: On Human Development, United Nations, New York, New York, September 28-29 (2020), Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 3679351, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3679351

Julia M. Puaschunder (Contact Author)

Harvard University ( email )

24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

New School for Social Research ( email )

6 East 16th Street
New York, NY 10003
United States

Columbia University ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
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Princeton University ( email )

22 Chambers Street
Princeton, NJ 08544-0708
United States

George Washington University Center for International Business Education and Research ( email )

2023 G Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
United States

The New School - Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (CEPA) ( email )

80 Fifth Ave.
5th Floor
New York, NY 10027
United States

Martin Gelter

Fordham University School of Law ( email )

150 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
United States
646-312-8752 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.fordham.edu/info/23135/martin_gelter

European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

HOME PAGE: http://ecgi.global/users/martin-gelter

Siegfried Sharma

Graz University of Technology ( email )

Kopernikusgasse 24/IV
Graz University of Technology,
GRAZ, STYRIA A-8010
Austria

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