The Effect of Gender-Targeted Transfers: Experimental Evidence From India

38 Pages Posted: 8 Sep 2020

See all articles by Vincent Somville

Vincent Somville

Norwegian School of Economics (NHH)

Ingvild Almås

Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES)

Lore Vandewalle

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) - Department of Economics; University of Oslo

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Date Written: September 4, 2020

Abstract

Women are the primary recipients of many welfare programs around the world. Despite frequent claims that targeting women induces beneficial consumption shifting and gender equality, the empirical evidence on the effect of targeting is relatively scarce. We report on a highly powered intervention that randomly allocates weekly transfers to a man or woman within the household. We use detailed financial diaries to look at the impact of the recipient's gender on expenditure, income, saving, nutrition and measures of decision-making. Our results show little evidence for consumption shifting at the household level but indicate that targeted transfers empower female recipients.

Keywords: Households, Consumption, Development, Gender Inequality

JEL Classification: D13, I14, O10

Suggested Citation

Somville, Vincent and Almås, Ingvild and Vandewalle, Lore, The Effect of Gender-Targeted Transfers: Experimental Evidence From India (September 4, 2020). NHH Dept. of Economics Discussion Paper No. 16/2020, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3686461 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3686461

Vincent Somville (Contact Author)

Norwegian School of Economics (NHH) ( email )

Helleveien 30
Bergen, NO-5045
Norway

Ingvild Almås

Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) ( email )

Stockholm, SE-10691
Sweden

Lore Vandewalle

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) - Department of Economics ( email )

Geneva Avenue de la Paix 11A
Geneva, 1202
Switzerland

University of Oslo ( email )

PO Box 6706 St Olavs plass
Oslo, N-0317
Norway

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