On the Origins of Gender-Biased Behavior: The Role of Explicit and Implicit Stereotypes

48 Pages Posted: 14 Sep 2020 Last revised: 5 Jul 2021

See all articles by Eliana Avitzour

Eliana Avitzour

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Adi Choen

Tel Aviv University

Daphna Joel

Tel Aviv University

Victor Lavy

University of Warwick - Department of Economics; Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: September 2020

Abstract

This study examines the role of implicit and explicit stereotypes behind gender-discriminatory behavior. The empirical context is the grading discriminatory behavior of math teachers in experimental settings. Previous observational studies demonstrated that math teachers show gender bias when grading papers. The mechanisms behind this behavior are mostly unexplored. We asked teachers to grade gender-manipulated exam papers and measured their grading behavior and implicit and explicit gender stereotypes. We found that implicit gender stereotypes and underestimating own implicit stereotypes were associated with boy-favoring grading behavior. Reducing implicit gender stereotypes and exposing teachers to their implicit biases may promote gender equality in schools.

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Suggested Citation

Avitzour, Eliana and Choen, Adi and Joel, Daphna and Lavy, Victor, On the Origins of Gender-Biased Behavior: The Role of Explicit and Implicit Stereotypes (September 2020). NBER Working Paper No. w27818, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3692175

Eliana Avitzour (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Adi Choen

Tel Aviv University

Ramat Aviv
Tel-Aviv, 6997801
Israel

Daphna Joel

Tel Aviv University

Ramat Aviv
Tel-Aviv, 6997801
Israel

Victor Lavy

University of Warwick - Department of Economics ( email )

Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom

Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Department of Economics ( email )

Mount Scopus
Jerusalem, 91905
Israel
+972 2 588 3245 (Phone)
+972 2 581 6071 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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