Interpreting Sars-Cov-2 Fatality Rate Estimates — A Case for Introducing Standardized Reporting to Improve Communication

21 Pages Posted: 25 Sep 2020

See all articles by Joseph Cavataio

Joseph Cavataio

University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology

Santiago Schnell

University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology; University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics

Date Written: September 19, 2020

Abstract

The SARS-CoV-2 virus has spread across the world, testing each country’s ability to understand the state of the pandemic in their country and control it. As we look to the data to put into perspective the potential harm the COVID-19 can cause, we discover that critical details that provide context to the data are missing. There are many reasons to establish a set of standard-based guidelines to record and report the data from epidemiological studies. This perspective explores a handful of these reasons, including standardizing nomenclature to improve communication, rigor and reproducibility, and making it easier for the general public, health officials, and policymakers to interpret epidemiological quantitative data as it pertains to COVID-19. The suggestions are not intended to be formulaic; they should be viewed as a starting point for guidelines that experts in the field can establish and encourage throughout the appropriate communities.

Note: Funding: None to declare

Declaration of Interest: None to declare.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, case fatality rate, infection fatality rate, standardization, metrics, rigor, reproducibility

Suggested Citation

Cavataio, Joseph and Schnell, Santiago, Interpreting Sars-Cov-2 Fatality Rate Estimates — A Case for Introducing Standardized Reporting to Improve Communication (September 19, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3695733 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3695733

Joseph Cavataio

University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology ( email )

7744 MS II
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Santiago Schnell (Contact Author)

University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology ( email )

7744 MS II
1137 E. Catherine St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5622
United States
(734) 615-8733 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.med.umich.edu/schnell-lab

University of Michigan Medical School - Department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics ( email )

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