Neo-Colonialism, Same Old Racism: A Critical Analysis of the United States' Shift toward Colorblindness as a Tool for the Protection of the American Colonial Empire and White Supremacy

The Berkeley Journal of African-American Law & Policy, 2009

37 Pages Posted: 13 Nov 2020

See all articles by Marissa Jackson Sow

Marissa Jackson Sow

Open Society Foundations (OSF); United Nations - Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights; St. John's University - School of Law

Date Written: September 2009

Abstract

The Article explains the shift in American law and politics towards colorblindness via definition and discussion of colonialism, and acknowledges the United States' past and present identity as a racist, colonial state. The Article begins with a discussion of colonialism, its roots in white supremacy, and its link to American liberal democracy. It analyzes shifts in the American approach to racism by examining the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States over the course of three time periods: the pre-civil rights era, the civil rights era, and the present post-civil rights, neo-conservative era. The Article illuminates the manner in which Supreme Court rulings reflect or catalyze shifts in theory and policy sustaining a white supremacist legal order. Using France as an illustrative model, the Author recommends a move away from colorblindness and the present neocolonial order in the United States towards an approach that is decidedly anti-racist and post-colonial.

Keywords: Race, White Supremacy, Colorblindness, Supreme Court of the United States

Suggested Citation

Jackson Sow, Marissa, Neo-Colonialism, Same Old Racism: A Critical Analysis of the United States' Shift toward Colorblindness as a Tool for the Protection of the American Colonial Empire and White Supremacy (September 2009). The Berkeley Journal of African-American Law & Policy, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3699715

Marissa Jackson Sow (Contact Author)

Open Society Foundations (OSF) ( email )

224 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
United States

United Nations - Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights ( email )

Palais des Nations
52 rue des Pâquis
CH-1201 Geneva
Switzerland

St. John's University - School of Law ( email )

8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY 11439
United States

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