The Disregarded Canary: On the Plight of Black Women Voters

4 Pages Posted: 15 Dec 2020

See all articles by Carliss Chatman

Carliss Chatman

Washington and Lee University School of Law

Marissa Jackson Sow

Open Society Foundations (OSF); United Nations - Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights; St. John's University - School of Law

Date Written: September 30, 2020

Abstract

“…. De nigger woman is de mule uh de world so fur as Ah can see.” -Zora Neal Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God

In American politics the Black woman voter is both mule and canary. Black women vote at higher rates than other demographics, and overwhelmingly and consistently vote Democratic—not because there is anything to gain but because doing so is necessary for the survival of the republic. Yet, two years after commentators declared 2018 to be the year Black women saved the Democratic party, they enjoy very little negotiating power at the polls. Black women voters carry the burden of saving the world, signal the end of democracy and the slow creep towards fascism, and remain an afterthought to the powers that be.

Suggested Citation

Chatman, Carliss and Jackson Sow, Marissa, The Disregarded Canary: On the Plight of Black Women Voters (September 30, 2020). Northwestern University Law Review of Note, 2020, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3702553

Carliss Chatman (Contact Author)

Washington and Lee University School of Law ( email )

204 W Washington St
Lexington, VA 24450
United States

Marissa Jackson Sow

Open Society Foundations (OSF) ( email )

224 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
United States

United Nations - Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights ( email )

Palais des Nations
52 rue des Pâquis
CH-1201 Geneva
Switzerland

St. John's University - School of Law ( email )

8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY 11439
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
122
Abstract Views
481
rank
313,310
PlumX Metrics