Police-Related Deaths and Neighborhood Economic and Racial/Ethnic Polarization

AJPH March 2019, Vol 109, No. 3

7 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2020

See all articles by Sofia Gruskin

Sofia Gruskin

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine; University of Southern California Gould School of Law; Harvard School of Public Health

Date Written: March 1, 2019

Abstract

To estimate the association between rates of police-related deaths and neighborhood residential segregation (by income, race/ethnicity, or both combined) in the United States. Methods: We identified police-related deaths that occurred in the United States (2015-2016) using a data set from the Guardian newspaper. We used census data to estimate expected police-related death counts for all US census tracts and to calculate the Index of Concentration at the Extremes as a segregation measure. We used multilevel negative binomial models for the analyses. Results: Overall, police-related death rates were highest in neighborhoods with the greatest concentrations of low-income residents (vs high-income residents) and residents of color (vs non-Hispanic White residents). For non-Hispanic Blacks, however, the risk was greater in the quintile of neighborhoods with the highest concentration of non-Hispanic White residents than in certain neighborhoods with relatively higher concentrations of residents of color (the third and fourth quintiles). Conclusions: Neighborhood context matters-beyond individual race/ethnicity-for understanding, preventing, and responding to the occurrence of police-related deaths. Public Health Implications. Efforts to monitor, prevent, and respond to police-related deaths should consider neighborhood context, including levels of segregation by income and race/ethnicity.

Suggested Citation

Gruskin, Sofia, Police-Related Deaths and Neighborhood Economic and Racial/Ethnic Polarization (March 1, 2019). AJPH March 2019, Vol 109, No. 3, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3703329

Sofia Gruskin (Contact Author)

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine ( email )

2001 N. Soto Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

HOME PAGE: http://globalhealth.usc.edu/ghhr

University of Southern California Gould School of Law ( email )

699 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Harvard School of Public Health ( email )

677 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA MA 02115
United States

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