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Bidirectional Control of Infant Social Behavior by Dopaminergic Innervation of the Basolateral Amygdala

56 Pages Posted: 20 Oct 2020 Publication Status: Published

See all articles by Maya Opendak

Maya Opendak

Johns Hopkins University - Kennedy Krieger Institute; New York University School of Medicine - Child Study Center

Charlis Raineki

Brock University

Rosemarie Perry

New York University (NYU) - Department of Applied Psychology

Emma Wood

Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research - Emotional Brain Institute

Katherine Packard

Johns Hopkins University - Kennedy Krieger Institute; New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Joyce Woo

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Roseanna Zanca

City University of New York - Department of Psychology

Krissian Martinez

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

K. Yaragudri Vinod

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Russell W. Brown

Eastern Tennessee State University - Quillen College of Medicine

Gerald Deehan

Eastern Tennessee State University - Department of Psychology

Peter Serrano

City University of New York - Department of Psychology

Donald Wilson

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Regina M. Sullivan

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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Abstract

Social interaction deficits seen in psychiatric disorders emerge in early-life and are most closely linked to aberrant neural circuit organization and function. Due to technical limitations, we have had little understanding of the typical ontogeny of social behavior neural circuits or how early caregiving adversity impacts infant neurobiology to perturb lifelong social interaction. Using a suite of invasive procedures in awake, behaving young infant rats, including optogenetics, microdialysis and microinfusions, we charted the gradual increase in social behavior deficits following adversity-rearing and dissected circuits controlling this process. Persistently elevated dopamine in basolateral amygdala (BLA) was necessary and sufficient in initiating social behavior pathology, as demonstrated by manipulation of amygdala dopamine during adversity and during expression of social behavior deficits with the mother and peers.  Taken together, these data highlight mesolimbic dopamine circuit organization and function as a potential therapeutic target in understanding behavioral deficits associated with psychiatric disorders.

Keywords: adversity, amygdala, dopamine, development, parenting, social behavior

Suggested Citation

Opendak, Maya and Raineki, Charlis and Perry, Rosemarie and Wood, Emma and Packard, Katherine and Woo, Joyce and Zanca, Roseanna and Martinez, Krissian and Vinod, K. Yaragudri and Brown, Russell W. and Deehan, Gerald and Serrano, Peter and Wilson, Donald and Sullivan, Regina M., Bidirectional Control of Infant Social Behavior by Dopaminergic Innervation of the Basolateral Amygdala. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3707263 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3707263
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Maya Opendak

Johns Hopkins University - Kennedy Krieger Institute ( email )

New York University School of Medicine - Child Study Center ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

Charlis Raineki

Brock University

500 Glenridge Avenue
St. Catherines, L2S 3A1
Canada

Rosemarie Perry

New York University (NYU) - Department of Applied Psychology ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

Emma Wood

Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research - Emotional Brain Institute

Katherine Packard

Johns Hopkins University - Kennedy Krieger Institute ( email )

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( email )

New York, NY
United States

Joyce Woo

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( email )

New York, NY
United States

Roseanna Zanca

City University of New York - Department of Psychology ( email )

695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
United States

Krissian Martinez

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( email )

New York, NY
United States

K. Yaragudri Vinod

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( email )

New York, NY
United States

Russell W. Brown

Eastern Tennessee State University - Quillen College of Medicine

Gerald Deehan

Eastern Tennessee State University - Department of Psychology ( email )

Peter Serrano

City University of New York - Department of Psychology ( email )

695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
United States

Donald Wilson

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

New York, NY
United States

Regina M. Sullivan (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

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