The Indian Press Act of 1910: The Press and Public Opinion at Crossroads in the Madras Presidency, 1910 – 1922*

8 Pages Posted: 8 Dec 2020

See all articles by V. Venkatraman

V. Venkatraman

Rajapalayam Rajus’ College; Rajapalayam Rajus' College

Date Written: November 6, 2020

Abstract

The British Government's approach towards Indian Press varied from time to time. The period from 1908 to 1935 witnessed the enactment of numerous press legislation to curb the anti-British tone of the Indian Press. The resurgence of political terrorism made the British to adopt a rigid stand towards the Indian nationalists. Lord Ridley, the Home Member introduced a Bill on 4th February 1910 to arrest the dissemination of anti-government literature. Lord Minto II, the Viceroy of India implemented the Indian Press Act of 1910 on 9th February, Section 12(1) of the Act empowered the Local Governments to issue warrants against any newspaper or book which contained seditious matters, were to be forfeited to his majesty. A large number of nationalist press and political literature were proscribed under the provision of the Indian Press Act, 1910.

Keywords: The Indian Press Act, The Public Opinion, The Hindu, Swadesamitran, Navasakthi, New India, Desabaktan and Dravidan

Suggested Citation

Venkatraman, V., The Indian Press Act of 1910: The Press and Public Opinion at Crossroads in the Madras Presidency, 1910 – 1922* (November 6, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3726057 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3726057

V. Venkatraman (Contact Author)

Rajapalayam Rajus’ College ( email )

Mudangiar Road
Rajapalayam, Tamil Nadu 626 117
India

Rajapalayam Rajus' College ( email )

Mudangiar Road
Rajapalayam, TN Tamilnadu 626117
India
9443421148 (Phone)
626117 (Fax)

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