Are Historic Districts A Backdoor for Segregation? Yes and No

37 Pages Posted: 27 Jan 2021

See all articles by Jamie Bologna Pavlik

Jamie Bologna Pavlik

Texas Tech University - Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics

Yang Zhou

University of North Texas - Department of Economics

Date Written: November 18, 2020

Abstract

Historic districts preserve the heritage of designated areas and tend to attract tourism income. However, these districts also come with specific restrictions and increased housing prices that could result in segregation. We study how two historic district programs impact residential segregation in Denver. We find that home buyers are more likely to be White within historic districts, but that the official designation has no effect on this probability. Similarly, when examining seller-to-buyer housing transactions, we find that most transactions flow from White sellers to White buyers, regardless of the official designation. Thus, while historic districts tend to be more segregated than their surrounding areas, the legal restrictions and housing premium that come with historic designations do not seem to amplify this existing problem.

Keywords: Historic district, segregation, machine learning

JEL Classification: R20, R30, J15

Suggested Citation

Bologna Pavlik, Jamie and Zhou, Yang, Are Historic Districts A Backdoor for Segregation? Yes and No (November 18, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3733105 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3733105

Jamie Bologna Pavlik

Texas Tech University - Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics ( email )

Suite 167, 2625 Memorial Circle
TTU Administration
Lubbock, TX 79409
United States

Yang Zhou (Contact Author)

University of North Texas - Department of Economics ( email )

1155 Union Circle #311457
Denton, TX Texas 76203-5017
United States

HOME PAGE: http://economics.unt.edu/people/yang-zhou

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