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Rhesus Macaques Build New Social Connections after a Natural Disaster

32 Pages Posted: 2 Dec 2020 Publication Status: Published

See all articles by Camille Testard

Camille Testard

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Neuroscience

Sam M. Larson

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Anthropology

Marina Watowich

University of Washington - Department of Biology

Cassandre H. Kaplinsky

University of Roehampton - Centre for Research in Evolutionary, Social and Inter-Disciplinary Anthropology

Antonia Bernau

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour

Matthew Faulder

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour

Angelina Ruiz-Lambides

University of Puerto Rico - Carribean Primate Research Center-Cayo Santiago

James P. Higham

New York University (NYU) - Department of Anthropology

Michael Montague

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Neuroscience

Noah Snyder-Mackler

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Life Sciences

Michael L. Platt

University of Pennsylvania - Marketing Department

Lauren J. N. Brent

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour

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Abstract

Climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of weather-related disasters such as hurricanes, wildfires, floods and droughts. Understanding resilience and vulnerability to these intense stressors and their aftermath will be critical for species conservation and human adaptation. In 2017, Puerto Rico suffered its worst natural disaster, Hurricane Maria, which left 3000 dead and fostered a mental health crisis. Cayo Santiago, home to a population of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was devastated by the same storm. We compared social networks of two groups of macaques before and after the hurricane and found an increase in affiliative social connections, driven largely by monkeys most isolated before Hurricane Maria. Partner-preference analysis revealed monkeys invested in building new relationships rather than strengthening existing ones. Evolved adaptations to environmental stochasticity may predispose rhesus macaques to success in rapidly changing anthropogenic environments.

Suggested Citation

Testard, Camille and Larson, Sam M. and Watowich, Marina and Kaplinsky, Cassandre H. and Bernau, Antonia and Faulder, Matthew and Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina and Higham, James P. and Montague, Michael and Snyder-Mackler, Noah and Platt, Michael L. and Brent, Lauren J. N., Rhesus Macaques Build New Social Connections after a Natural Disaster. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3741230 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3741230
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Camille Testard (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Neuroscience ( email )

423 Guardian Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Sam M. Larson

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Anthropology ( email )

Philadelphia, PA
United States

Marina Watowich

University of Washington - Department of Biology ( email )

404 Kinkaid Hall
Box 351800
Seattle, WA 98195-1800
United States

Cassandre H. Kaplinsky

University of Roehampton - Centre for Research in Evolutionary, Social and Inter-Disciplinary Anthropology ( email )

Roehampton Lane
London, SW15 5PU
United Kingdom

Antonia Bernau

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour ( email )

Northcote House
The Queen's Drive
Exeter, Devon EX4 4QJ
United Kingdom

Matthew Faulder

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour ( email )

Northcote House
The Queen's Drive
Exeter, Devon EX4 4QJ
United Kingdom

Angelina Ruiz-Lambides

University of Puerto Rico - Carribean Primate Research Center-Cayo Santiago ( email )

Ponce De Leon Avenue
00931-3300
Puerto Rico

James P. Higham

New York University (NYU) - Department of Anthropology ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

Michael Montague

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Neuroscience ( email )

423 Guardian Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Noah Snyder-Mackler

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Life Sciences ( email )

Farmer Building 440G PO Box 872011
Tempe, AZ 85287
United States

Michael L. Platt

University of Pennsylvania - Marketing Department ( email )

700 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
3730 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6340
United States

Lauren J. N. Brent

University of Exeter - Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour ( email )

Northcote House
The Queen's Drive
Exeter, Devon EX4 4QJ
United Kingdom

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