Creating Climate Coalitions: Mass Preferences for Compensating Vulnerability in the World’s Two Largest Democracies

68 Pages Posted: 14 Jan 2021 Last revised: 19 Jan 2022

See all articles by Nikhar Gaikwad

Nikhar Gaikwad

Columbia University - Department of Political Science

Federica Genovese

University of Essex

Dustin Tingley

Harvard University

Date Written: December 4, 2020

Abstract

Combating climate change requires large economic adjustments with significant distributional
implications. To build coalitions of support, scholars and policymakers propose compensating individuals who will bear decarbonization's costs. What are the determinants of public opinion regarding climate compensation and investment? We theorize that climate policy vulnerability and climate change vulnerability induce support for distinct types of climate policy. Fielding original surveys in the United States and India, we show that people who reside in coal-producing regions prefer compensation for lost jobs. The general public privileges diffuse redistribution mechanisms and investments, discounting compensation to targeted groups. Those who are both physically and economically vulnerable have cross-cutting preferences. Nevertheless, there is considerable support across our samples for policies that compensate different coalitions of climate vulnerable citizens, in line with theories of `just energy' transition and embedded liberalism. We trace the distinctive compensatory preferences of fossil fuel communities to a logic of shared community identities.

Keywords: climate change, compensation, investment, vulnerability, United States, India, fossil fuels, decarbonization

JEL Classification: F64, F68, Q54, Q58

Suggested Citation

Gaikwad, Nikhar and Genovese, Federica and Tingley, Dustin, Creating Climate Coalitions: Mass Preferences for Compensating Vulnerability in the World’s Two Largest Democracies (December 4, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3742987 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3742987

Nikhar Gaikwad (Contact Author)

Columbia University - Department of Political Science ( email )

7th Floor, International Affairs Bldg.
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States

Federica Genovese

University of Essex ( email )

Wivenhoe Park
Colchester CO4 3SQ, CO4 3SQ
United Kingdom

Dustin Tingley

Harvard University

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