Gender Differences in Face-to-Face Deceptive Behavior

38 Pages Posted: 16 Dec 2020

See all articles by Tim Lohse

Tim Lohse

Berlin School of Economics and Law; Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance

Salmai Qari

German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin); Berlin School of Economics and Law

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 2020

Abstract

We study the role of face-to-face interaction for gender differences in deceptive behavior and perceived honesty. In the first part, we compare women to men’s deceptive behavior using data from an incentivized income-reporting experiment with three treatments. Reporting is fully computerized in a baseline treatment but occurs face-to-face in the second and third treatment. Lies can be detected in the course of an audit, which happens with a given probability in the first and second treatment whereas it depends on perceptions by others in the third treatment. In the computerized baseline treatment, men and women’s deceptive behavior is statistically indistinguishable. However, women’s truthfulness increases when face-to-face interaction is introduced in the second treatment. In contrast, males’ deceptive behavior does not change until the audit probability depends on their perceived honesty in the third treatment. Then, men’s truthfulness rises sharply and exceeds women’s level of honesty by far. We elaborate on these gender differences in the second part. We conduct an experiment to assess the honesty of videotaped income-reporting statements from a setting identical to the third treatment. Our findings confirm that men anticipate their low perceived honesty, which is consistent with the results from the first part.

Keywords: Gender differences, lying, face-to-face interaction, honesty assess- ment, perception, video analysis, laboratory experiment

JEL Classification: C91,D91,J16

Suggested Citation

Lohse, Tim and Qari, Salmai, Gender Differences in Face-to-Face Deceptive Behavior (December 2020). DIW Berlin Discussion Paper No. 1922, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3749894 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3749894

Tim Lohse (Contact Author)

Berlin School of Economics and Law ( email )

Badensche Strasse 50-51
Berlin, D-10825
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.hwr-berlin.de/en/prof/tim-lohse

Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance

Marstallplatz 1
Munich, 80539
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.tax.mpg.de/en/pub/public_economics/research_affiliates/tim_lohse.cfm

Salmai Qari

German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) ( email )

Mohrenstraße 58
Berlin, 10117
Germany

Berlin School of Economics and Law ( email )

Badensche Strasse 50-51
Berlin, D-10825
Germany

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