Bridging the Gap: The Case for an ‘Incompletely Theorized Agreement’ on AI Policy

AI and Ethics, Springer

20 Pages Posted: 18 Feb 2021

See all articles by Charlotte Stix

Charlotte Stix

Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE); University of Cambridge - Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence

Matthijs M. Maas

Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, University of Cambridge; University of Cambridge - King's College, Cambridge; University of Copenhagen - CECS- Centre for European and Comparative Legal Studies

Date Written: December 28, 2020

Abstract

Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) raises a wide array of ethical and societal concerns. Accordingly, an appropriate policy approach is needed today. While there has been a wave of scholarship in this field, the research community at times appears divided amongst those who emphasize ‘near-term’ concerns, and those focusing on ‘long-term’ concerns and corresponding policy measures. In this paper, we seek to map and critically examine this alleged ‘gulf’, with a view to understanding the practical space for inter-community collaboration on AI policy. This culminates in a proposal to make use of the legal notion of an ‘incompletely theorized agreement’. We propose that on certain issue areas, scholars working with near-term and long-term perspectives can converge and cooperate on selected mutually beneficial AI policy projects all the while maintaining divergent perspectives.

Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Artificial Intelligence policy, long-term, short-term, Artificial intelligence ethics, cooperation models, incompletely theorized agreement, overlapping consensus

JEL Classification: K

Suggested Citation

Stix, Charlotte and Maas, Matthijs M., Bridging the Gap: The Case for an ‘Incompletely Theorized Agreement’ on AI Policy (December 28, 2020). AI and Ethics, Springer, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3756437

Charlotte Stix (Contact Author)

Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE) ( email )

PO Box 513
Eindhoven, 5600 MB
Netherlands

University of Cambridge - Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence ( email )

United Kingdom

Matthijs M. Maas

Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, University of Cambridge ( email )

Trinity Ln
Cambridge, CB2 1TN
United Kingdom

University of Cambridge - King's College, Cambridge

King's Parade
Cambridge, CB2 1ST
United Kingdom

University of Copenhagen - CECS- Centre for European and Comparative Legal Studies ( email )

Karen Blixens Plads 16
Copenhagen, DK-2300
Denmark

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