Religious Minorities and the Constitution of the Irish Free State, 1922-1937

59 Pages Posted: 19 Jan 2021

See all articles by Thomas Mohr

Thomas Mohr

Sutherland School of Law, University College Dublin

Date Written: January 19, 2021

Abstract

This article examines special constitutional provisions adopted in 1922 that were aimed at religious minorities in the Irish Free State. It analyses the origins and operation of the special provisions of the 1922 constitution of the Irish Free State aimed at protecting the rights of religious minorities and giving them a significant voice within the legislature. It also analyses how and why most of these safeguards were removed from the 1922 constitution and were not replicated in the 1937 constitution of Ireland that remains in force to this day. The conclusion argues that one of the weaknesses of the constitutional provisions aimed at religious minorities was that they did not openly include this objective in their wording. This facilitated the removal of almost all of these provisions in the 1930s while ignoring or openly denying that they were aimed at religious minorities despite ample historical evidence to the contrary.

Keywords: Religious Minorities, rights, the Constitution, Irish Free State, 1922-1937, special provisions; legislature

Suggested Citation

Mohr, Thomas, Religious Minorities and the Constitution of the Irish Free State, 1922-1937 (January 19, 2021). UCD Working Papers in Law, Criminology & Socio-Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1/2021, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3769185 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3769185

Thomas Mohr (Contact Author)

Sutherland School of Law, University College Dublin ( email )

Belfield
Dublin 4
Ireland

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