The Hierarchy of the Offshore US-Dollar System. On Swap Lines, the FIMA Repo Facility and Special Drawing Rights

Boston University, Global Development Policy Center, Global Economic Governance Initiative, GEGI Study, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.48440/iass.2021.005

38 Pages Posted: 19 Mar 2021

See all articles by Steffen Murau

Steffen Murau

Boston University - Global Development Policy Center; Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS)

Fabian Pape

University of Warwick

Tobias Pforr

European University Institute

Date Written: February 2021

Abstract

While it has become common to regard the international monetary system as hierarchical, the nature, shape and origin of this hierarchy often remain vague.

Taking on board insights of critical macro-finance, this study from the Global Economic Governance Initiative at the Global Development Policy Center conceptualizes international monetary hierarchy by focusing on different mechanisms to supply emergency US-Dollar (USD) liquidity from the Federal Reserve (Fed) to non-US central banks and develops a model of the global financial architecture as a web of hierarchical interlocking balance sheets.

The model perceives today’s international monetary system as an ‘Offshore USD System,’ as it is based on using and creating USD-denominated credit money instruments ‘offshore’, i.e. outside the US. The centrality of the USD as global ‘key currency’ places the US monetary jurisdiction at the apex and pushes all other monetary jurisdictions into a peripheral position. While private credit money creation is the default mechanism in normal times, central banks become paramount when private credit money instruments are about to endogenously implode in a crisis. The mechanisms through which non-US central banks can access emergency USD liquidity from the Fed determine the international hierarchy below the apex.

Currently, there are three different mechanisms for non-US central banks to access the Fed’s balance sheet to attain emergency USD liquidity: the Fed’s central bank swap lines, the Fed’s new repo facility for Foreign and International Monetary Authorities (FIMA), and the Special Drawing Rights (SDR) system administered by the International Monetary Fund.

These mechanisms create three peripheral layers in the Offshore USD System. Not only do they matter when they are actually used in systemic crises, but also during normal times. Peripheral monetary jurisdictions that are higher up in the international hierarchy receive a more flexible and inexpensive implicit liquidity guarantee that increases their banking systems’ elasticity space.

Keywords: international monetary system; Federal Reserve; Exchange Stabilization Fund; key currency; lender of last resort; emergency liquidity; International Monetary Fund; IMF; European Central Bank; Bank of Japan; People's Bank of China; Central Bank of Russia; Global Financial Safety Net

Suggested Citation

Murau, Steffen and Pape, Fabian and Pforr, Tobias, The Hierarchy of the Offshore US-Dollar System. On Swap Lines, the FIMA Repo Facility and Special Drawing Rights (February 2021). Boston University, Global Development Policy Center, Global Economic Governance Initiative, GEGI Study, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.48440/iass.2021.005, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3780794 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3780794

Steffen Murau (Contact Author)

Boston University - Global Development Policy Center ( email )

53 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
United States

Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) ( email )

Berlinerstrasse 130
Potsdam
Germany

Fabian Pape

University of Warwick ( email )

Gibbet Hill Rd.
Coventry, West Midlands CV4 8UW
United Kingdom

Tobias Pforr

European University Institute ( email )

Villa Schifanoia
133 via Bocaccio
Firenze (Florence), Tuscany 50014
Italy

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