Timing CEO Turnovers: Evidence from Delegation in Mergers and Acquisitions

47 Pages Posted: 26 Mar 2021

See all articles by Daniel Greene

Daniel Greene

Clemson University

Jared D. Smith

North Carolina State University - Poole College of Management

Date Written: February 25, 2021

Abstract

We examine the role of delegation in predicting CEO successions. Using a novel proxy for delegation in mergers and acquisitions, we find that overall CEO turnover rates are about one third higher following deals where the CEO delegates to a senior manager versus deals with no observable delegation. The delegation-turnover relation is strongest when deals are delegated to heirs apparent, the CEO is older, or the delegation decision is unexpected. Voluntary turnovers are more frequent following delegated deals than non-delegated deals, consistent with delegation signaling an orderly succession. The delegation-turnover relation fades over time while other predictors of turnover such as profitability, CEO age, and the presence of an heir apparent in the corporate hierarchy continue to remain significant up to five years after the deal. Our findings suggest that delegation is unique among our predictors of turnover in the sense that it captures near term orderly successions.

Keywords: CEO Turnover, Orderly Successions, Delegation, Mergers and Acquisitions

JEL Classification: G30, G34

Suggested Citation

Greene, Daniel and Smith, Jared D., Timing CEO Turnovers: Evidence from Delegation in Mergers and Acquisitions (February 25, 2021). Journal of Banking and Finance, Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3793022

Daniel Greene (Contact Author)

Clemson University ( email )

101 Sikes Ave
Clemson, SC 29634
United States

Jared D. Smith

North Carolina State University - Poole College of Management ( email )

Nelson Hall
Raleigh, NC 27695-8614
United States

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