Gender Gaps in Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills: Roles of Ses and Gender Attitudes

46 Pages Posted: 3 Mar 2021

See all articles by Justine Herve

Justine Herve

Fordham University

Subha Mani

Fordham University - Fordham College at Rose Hill; Population Studies Center; Global Labor Organization (GLO)

Jere Behrman

University of Pennsylvania

Arindam Nandi

The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP); The Population Council

Anjana Sankhil Lamkang

The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP)

Ramanan Laxminarayan

Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy; The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP); Princeton University

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Abstract

Gender gaps in skills exist around the world but differ remarkably among the high and low-and-middle income countries. This paper uses a unique data set with more than 20,000 adolescents in rural India to examine whether socioeconomic status and gender attitudes predict gender gaps in cognitive and noncognitive skills. We find steep socioeconomic and attitude gradients in both cognitive and noncognitive skills, with bigger effect sizes for the socioeconomic status (SES) gradients. Our results suggest that a sizable improvement in gender attitudes would yield important gains for females, but substantial gains would come only from large improvements in household socioeconomic status. Overall, the household socioeconomic and cultural environment is significantly associated with the gender gaps in both cognitive and noncognitive skills.

JEL Classification: I21, I25, J13, J16, J24

Suggested Citation

Herve, Justine and Mani, Subha and Behrman, Jere and Nandi, Arindam and Nandi, Arindam and Sankhil Lamkang, Anjana and Laxminarayan, Ramanan and Laxminarayan, Ramanan, Gender Gaps in Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills: Roles of Ses and Gender Attitudes. IZA Discussion Paper No. 14132, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3794078

Justine Herve (Contact Author)

Fordham University ( email )

113 West 60th Street
New York, NY 10023
United States

Subha Mani

Fordham University - Fordham College at Rose Hill ( email )

United States

Population Studies Center ( email )

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School of Arts and Sciences
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Global Labor Organization (GLO) ( email )

Collogne
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Jere Behrman

University of Pennsylvania

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United States

Arindam Nandi

The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) ( email )

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The Population Council ( email )

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Anjana Sankhil Lamkang

The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) ( email )

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Washington DC, DC 20036
United States

Ramanan Laxminarayan

Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy ( email )

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The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) ( email )

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