'Without a Mother': Qualitative Findings About the Impacts of Maternal Mortality on Families in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Knight and Yamin, Reproductive Health 2015, 12(Suppl 1):S5

11 Pages Posted: 1 Apr 2021

See all articles by Lucia Knight

Lucia Knight

University of the Western Cape - School of Public Health

Alicia Ely Yamin

Harvard University - Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics; Harvard University - Harvard Law School; Partners in Health; Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI) - Center on Law and Social Transformation

Date Written: May 6, 2015

Abstract

Background: Maternal mortality in South Africa is high and a cause for concern especially because the bulk of deaths from maternal causes are preventable. One of the proposed reasons for persistently high maternal mortality is HIV which causes death both indirectly and directly. While there is some evidence for the impact of maternal death on children and families in South Africa, few studies have explored the impacts of maternal mortality on the well-being of the surviving infants, older children and family. This study provides qualitative insight into the consequences of maternal mortality for child and family well-being throughout the life-course.

Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in rural and peri-urban communities in Vulindlela, KwaZulu-Natal. The sample included 22 families directly affected by maternal mortality, 15 community stakeholders and 7 community focus group discussions. These provided unique and diverse perspectives about the causes, experiences and impacts of maternal mortality.

Results and discussion: Children left behind were primarily cared for by female family members, even where a father was alive and involved. The financial burden for care and children’s basic needs were largely met through government grants (direct and indirectly targeted at children) and/or through an obligation for the father or his family to assist. The repercussions of losing a mother were felt more by older children for whom it was harder for caregivers to provide educational supervision and emotional or psychological support. Respondents expressed concerns about adolescent’s educational attainment, general behavior and particularly girl’s sexual risk.

Conclusion: These results illuminate the high costs to surviving children and their families of failing to reduce maternal mortality in South Africa. Ensuring social protection and community support is important for remaining children and families. Additional qualitative evidence is needed to explore differential effects for children by gender and to guide future research and inform policies and programs aimed at supporting maternal orphans and other vulnerable children throughout their development.

Note:
Funding Statement: This project has been conducted with support from The John and Katie Hansen Family Foundation.

Declaration of Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Ethic Approval Statement: Study protocols were approved by the Harvard School of Public Health Institutional Review Board and the Human Sciences Research Council Research Ethics Committee in South Africa. Informed consent was read verbatim by the research coordinator and all participants indicated consent through a signature. Family member and focus group participants also received ZAR 110 (10.50 USD) for their participation.

Suggested Citation

Knight, Lucia and Yamin, Alicia Ely, 'Without a Mother': Qualitative Findings About the Impacts of Maternal Mortality on Families in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (May 6, 2015). Knight and Yamin, Reproductive Health 2015, 12(Suppl 1):S5, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3795612

Lucia Knight (Contact Author)

University of the Western Cape - School of Public Health ( email )

Cape Town
South Africa

Alicia Ely Yamin

Harvard University - Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics ( email )

23 Everett Street
Cambridge, MA 02155
United States

Harvard University - Harvard Law School ( email )

1563 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Partners in Health ( email )

641 Huntington Ave, 1st Floor
Boston, MA 02115
United States

Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI) - Center on Law and Social Transformation ( email )

PO Box 6033 Postterminalen
Bergen, NO-5892
Norway

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
4
Abstract Views
15
PlumX Metrics