Electoral Systems and Political Attitudes: Experimental Evidence

31 Pages Posted: 13 May 2021

See all articles by Sean Fischer

Sean Fischer

University of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication

Amber Lee

University of Pennsylvania

Yphtach Lelkes

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science; University of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication

Date Written: May 12, 2021

Abstract

The quality of a democracy is, in part, determined by citizen attitudes. In particular, electoral winners and losers should believe that elections are fair, and interparty animosity should be minimal. While scholars have argued that disproportional electoral institutions increase the perceived system legitimacy gap between electoral winners and losers and increase affective polarization, they have relied on cross-sectional observational data. As correlates of electoral systems are also correlated with these attitudes, causal statements linking systems to attitudes are problematic. We also do not know whether people react to unfairness endemic to plurality systems or the downstream effects of these institutions, such as more vitriolic campaigns or elite polarization. Using a novel large-scale behavioral game that randomized participants to different electoral systems with other participants and that varied both in rules and number of parties to choose from, we examine whether electoral institutions directly affect subsequent attitudes. We find that non-plurality systems with many parties have the smallest winner-loser gap. While increasing the number of parties decrease interparty animosity, we found, surprisingly, that plurality systems on their own had the lowest levels of interparty animosty. However, within proportional systems, increasing the number of parties decreases interparty animosity.

Keywords: public opinion, polarization

Suggested Citation

Fischer, Sean and Lee, Amber and Lelkes, Yphtach, Electoral Systems and Political Attitudes: Experimental Evidence (May 12, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3803603 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3803603

Sean Fischer

University of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication

Amber Lee

University of Pennsylvania

Yphtach Lelkes (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science ( email )

Stiteler Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

University of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication ( email )

Do you have negative results from your research you’d like to share?

Paper statistics

Downloads
516
Abstract Views
1,727
Rank
98,237
PlumX Metrics