Governing Artificial Intelligence in China and the European Union: Comparing Aims and Promoting Ethical Outcomes

The Information Society

43 Pages Posted: 24 Mar 2021 Last revised: 27 Aug 2023

See all articles by Huw Roberts

Huw Roberts

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute

Josh Cowls

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute

Emmie Hine

Yale University - Digital Ethics Center; University of Bologna- Department of Legal Studies; KU Leuven - Centre for IT & IP Law (CiTiP)

Jessica Morley

University of Oxford - Bennett Institute of Applied Data Science

Mariarosaria Taddeo

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute

Vincent Wang

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Luciano Floridi

Yale University - Digital Ethics Center; University of Bologna- Department of Legal Studies

Date Written: 01 09, 2022

Abstract

In this article, we compare the artificial intelligence strategies of China and the European Union, assessing the key similarities and differences regarding what the high-level aims of each governance strategy are, how the development and use of AI is promoted in the public and private sectors, and whom these policies are meant to benefit. We characterise China’s strategy by its primary focus on fostering innovation and a more recent emphasis on “common prosperity”, and the EU’s on promoting ethical outcomes through protecting fundamental rights. Building on this comparative analysis, we consider the areas where the EU and China could learn from and improve upon each other’s approaches to AI governance to promote more ethical outcomes. We outline policy recommendations for both European and Chinese policymakers that would support them in achieving this aim.

Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, China, European Union, Ethics, Governance

Suggested Citation

Roberts, Huw and Cowls, Josh and Hine, Emmie and Morley, Jessica and Taddeo, Mariarosaria and Wang, Vincent and Floridi, Luciano, Governing Artificial Intelligence in China and the European Union: Comparing Aims and Promoting Ethical Outcomes (01 09, 2022). The Information Society, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3811034

Huw Roberts (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute ( email )

1 St. Giles
University of Oxford
Oxford OX1 3PG Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire OX1 3JS
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://digitalethicslab.oii.ox.ac.uk/huw-roberts/

Josh Cowls

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute ( email )

1 St. Giles
University of Oxford
Oxford OX1 3PG Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire OX1 3JS
United Kingdom

Emmie Hine

Yale University - Digital Ethics Center ( email )

85, Trumbull Street
New Haven, CT 06511
United States

University of Bologna- Department of Legal Studies ( email )

Via Zamboni 22
Bologna, Bo 40100
Italy

KU Leuven - Centre for IT & IP Law (CiTiP) ( email )

Sint-Michielsstraat 6 box 3443
Leuven, 3000
Belgium

Jessica Morley

University of Oxford - Bennett Institute of Applied Data Science ( email )

Mariarosaria Taddeo

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute ( email )

1 St. Giles
University of Oxford
Oxford OX1 3PG Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire OX1 3JS
United Kingdom

Vincent Wang

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Luciano Floridi

Yale University - Digital Ethics Center ( email )

85 Trumbull Street
New Haven, CT CT 06511
United States
2034326473 (Phone)

University of Bologna- Department of Legal Studies ( email )

Via Zamboni 22
Bologna, Bo 40100
Italy

HOME PAGE: http://www.unibo.it/sitoweb/luciano.floridi/en

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