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SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in an Urban District in Cameroon

31 Pages Posted: 25 Mar 2021

See all articles by Kenechukwu David Nwosu

Kenechukwu David Nwosu

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Joseph Fokam

Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB)

Franck Wanda

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES)

Lucien Mama

Regional Delegation of Public Health - Health District of Cite Verte

Erol Orel

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Nicolas Ray

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Jeanine Meke

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES)

Armel Tassegning

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES)

Desire Takou

Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB)

Eric Mimbe

Hopital Central de Yaounde - Site de Coordination ANRS Cameroun

Beat Stoll

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Josselin Guillebert

Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Eric Comte

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Olivia Keiser

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Laura Ciaffi

Hopital Central de Yaounde - Site de Coordination ANRS Cameroun

More...

Abstract

Background: The extent of SARS-CoV-2 circulation in many African countries remains unclear, underscoring the need for antibody sero-surveys to accurately assess the cumulative attack rate.

Methods: We conducted a community-based, cross-sectional sero-survey in Cité Verte, a densely-populated district of Yaoundé, Cameroon, from October 14 to November 26, 2020. Households were randomly selected from a set of all putative residential buildings in the district, and residents between five and 80 years of age were surveyed. The Abbott Panbio SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid IgM/IgG rapid antibody test was administered, along with a questionnaire on disease symptoms and health-seeking behavior. Final seroprevalence estimates were adjusted for test accuracy and re-weighted to the city’s age-sex distribution. Random-intercept logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seropositivity.

Findings: Of 255 households randomly selected, 180 (70·6%) agreed to participate, yielding a sample of 971 participants. The adjusted seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies was 29·2% (95%CI 24·3–34·1). Out of the 302 IgG seropositive individuals, the majority (64·2% [58·7–69·4]) did not report any symptoms over the pandemic period, and most (91·1% [87·3–93·8]) did not consult medical care. Significantly greater odds of IgG seropositivity was found for men (OR: 1·61 [95%CI 1·2–2·2]), residents of households with six or more residents (OR: 1·6 [1·1–2·4]; reference: households with three to five residents) and individuals with a BMI above 30 kg/m² (OR: 1·84 [1·1–3·0]; reference: 18·5–24.9 kg/m²). 

Interpretation: By November 2020, the cumulative attack rate of COVID-19 was high in this Cameroonian city, about 323 times greater than the 0.09% nationwide attack rate implied by PCR and antigen- confirmed case counts at the time. The predominantly asymptomatic nature of cases may explain the low COVID-19-related healthcare consultation. Despite the high seroprevalence, most of the population has not been infected with SARS-CoV-2, underlining the importance of continued measures to control viral spread and of quick vaccine deployment to protect the vulnerable.

Funding: The UHC Program and Bilateral Health Project in Cameroon of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, the P4H Health Financing Network, and the Canton of Geneva.

Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Ethics Approval Statement: The study protocol obtained the ethical clearance (N°2020/09/1292/CE/CNERSH/SP) and the administrative authorization of the Ministry of Health of Cameroon (N°D30- 845/L/MINSANTE/SG/DROS).

Suggested Citation

Nwosu, Kenechukwu David and Fokam, Joseph and Wanda, Franck and Mama, Lucien and Orel, Erol and Ray, Nicolas and Meke, Jeanine and Tassegning, Armel and Takou, Desire and Mimbe, Eric and Stoll, Beat and Guillebert, Josselin and Comte, Eric and Keiser, Olivia and Ciaffi, Laura, SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in an Urban District in Cameroon. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3812428 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3812428

Kenechukwu David Nwosu (Contact Author)

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Joseph Fokam

Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB) ( email )

Yaoundé
Cameroon

Franck Wanda

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES) ( email )

Lucien Mama

Regional Delegation of Public Health - Health District of Cite Verte ( email )

Erol Orel

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health

Geneva
Switzerland

Nicolas Ray

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Jeanine Meke

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES) ( email )

Armel Tassegning

Centre International de Recherches, d'Enseignments, et de Soins (CIRES) ( email )

Desire Takou

Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB)

Yaoundé
Cameroon

Eric Mimbe

Hopital Central de Yaounde - Site de Coordination ANRS Cameroun ( email )

Yaounde
Cameroon

Beat Stoll

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Josselin Guillebert

Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH ( email )

Germany

Eric Comte

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Olivia Keiser

University of Geneva - Institute of Global Health ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Laura Ciaffi

Hopital Central de Yaounde - Site de Coordination ANRS Cameroun

Yaounde
Cameroon

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