The Gas-in-Place and CO2 Storage Capacity of Shale Reservoirs at Subsurface Conditions

7 Pages Posted: 8 Apr 2021

See all articles by Humera Ansari

Humera Ansari

Imperial College London

Martin Trusler

Imperial College London - Qatar Carbonate and Carbon Storage Research Centre

Geoffrey Maitland

Imperial College London

Claudio Delle Piane

CSIRO

Ronny Pini

Imperial College London

Date Written: April 6, 2021

Abstract

The recent rise in global shale gas production rates has renewed interest in making extraction more efficient. Enhanced recovery using CO2 injection can be a potential solution and achieve two simultaneous benefits: more CH4 recovery and secure CO2 storage. This would be accomplished by displacing CH4 in the shale reservoir by exploiting the preferential adsorption of CO2 on the shale surface. To properly assess the potential of enhanced recovery, a robust understanding of the Gas-in-Place (GIP) and the factors that influence it is required. In this study, high pressure adsorption measurements with CO2 and CH4 have been performed on two shales, the Longmaxi and the Marcellus shales, using a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension Balance. To further evaluate the effect of shale composition on adsorption, the same measurements have been performed on a synthetic mesoporous carbon. The three sets of adsorption isotherms have been used to compute the GIP at subsurface conditions. The agreement between the shales and the mesoporous carbon data suggests that shale’s mesoporosity drives shale gas storage and that the organic matter is the main influence on gas adsorption capacities in shales.

Keywords: Shale, GIP, CO2 Storage, Adsorption

Suggested Citation

Ansari, Humera and Trusler, Martin and Maitland, Geoffrey and Delle Piane, Claudio and Pini, Ronny, The Gas-in-Place and CO2 Storage Capacity of Shale Reservoirs at Subsurface Conditions (April 6, 2021). Proceedings of the 15th Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies Conference 15-18 March 2021, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3820831 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3820831

Humera Ansari (Contact Author)

Imperial College London ( email )

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom

Martin Trusler

Imperial College London - Qatar Carbonate and Carbon Storage Research Centre

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom

Geoffrey Maitland

Imperial College London ( email )

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, Greater London SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom
+44 2075891830 (Phone)

Claudio Delle Piane

CSIRO ( email )

26 Dick Perry Avenue
Kensington, WA Western Australia 6151
Australia
0864368716 (Phone)

Ronny Pini

Imperial College London ( email )

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, Greater London SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom

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