The Effect of Unobserved preferences and Race on Vaccination Hesitancy for COVID-19 Vaccines: Implications for Health Disparities

27 Pages Posted: 7 May 2021

See all articles by Eline van den Broek-Altenburg

Eline van den Broek-Altenburg

University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine - Department of Radiology

Jamie Benson

University of Vermont - Larner College of Medicine

Adam Atherly

Center for Health Services Research, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont

Stephane Hess

University of Leeds

Date Written: April 8, 2021

Abstract

Background: Reducing the extra burden COVID-19 is having on people already facing disparities is among the main national priorities for the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. Early reports from states releasing vaccination data by race show that White residents are being vaccinated at significantly higher rates than Black residents. Public health efforts are being targeted to address vaccine hesitancy among Blacks and other minority populations. However, health care interventions intended to reduce health disparities that do not reflect the underlying values of individuals in underrepresented populations are unlikely to be successful.

Objective: To identify key factors underlying the disparities in COVID-19 vaccination.
Data sources: Primary data were collected from an online survey of a representative sample of the population of the four largest U.S. states (New York; California; Texas; Florida) between August 10 through September 3rd, 2020.

Study Design: Using latent class analysis, we built a model identifying key factors underlying the disparities in COVID-19 vaccination.

Principal findings: We found that subgroups among Black residents are not hesitant at all.

Conclusions: Results suggest that other factors, potentially institutional, are driving the vaccination rates for these groups. Our model results help point the way to more effective differentiated policies.

Note: Funding Statement: No funding was received for this study.

Declaration of Interests: The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Ethics Approval Statement: The study has been reviewed by the University of Vermont Institutional Review Board which determined, on 7/6/2020, that the study is research that does not involve human subjects under 45 CFR 46.102(f).

Keywords: COVID-19, vaccination rates, vaccine hesitancy, health disparities, individual preference heterogeneity

Suggested Citation

van den Broek-Altenburg, Eline and Benson, Jamie and Atherly, Adam and Hess, Stephane, The Effect of Unobserved preferences and Race on Vaccination Hesitancy for COVID-19 Vaccines: Implications for Health Disparities (April 8, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3822794 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3822794

Eline Van den Broek-Altenburg (Contact Author)

University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine - Department of Radiology ( email )

89 Beaumont avenue
Burlington, VT Vermont 05405
United States

Jamie Benson

University of Vermont - Larner College of Medicine ( email )

89 Beaumont avenue
Burlington, VT Vermont 05405
United States

Adam Atherly

Center for Health Services Research, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont ( email )

89 Beaumont Avenue
Burlington, VT 05405-0158
United States

Stephane Hess

University of Leeds ( email )

Leeds, LS2 9JT
United Kingdom

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