Global Impunity: How Police Laws & Policies in the World's Wealthiest Countries Fail International Human Rights Standards

41 Pages Posted: 29 Apr 2021 Last revised: 3 Jun 2021

See all articles by Claudia Flores

Claudia Flores

University of Chicago - Law School

Brian Citro

Independent

Nino Guruli

University of Illinois at Chicago - UIC John Marshall Law School

Hannah S. Abrahams

University of Chicago - Law School

Mariana Olaizola Rosenblat

University of Chicago - Law School

Chelsea Kehrer

University of Chicago - Law School

Date Written: 2021

Abstract

The use of lethal force by law enforcement falls within the constraints set by international human rights. In particular, four standards govern whether and to what extent police may use lethal force: legality, necessity, proportionality, and accountability. However, every year, tens of thousands of civilians die at the hands of law enforcement worldwide, indicating a dysfunction in the nature of policing at a global scale. This study examines the written directives provided to police officers in the largest cities of the twenty-nine wealthiest countries and evaluates their compliance with the above standards. The study concludes that none of the directives in these cities complied with basic human rights standards, falling short in a variety of ways. By evaluating these directives, the report sheds light on enduring concerns about government abuses of power and suggests a way to constrain police use of force going forward.

Suggested Citation

Flores, Claudia and Citro, Brian and Guruli, Nino and Abrahams, Hannah S. and Olaizola Rosenblat, Mariana and Kehrer, Chelsea, Global Impunity: How Police Laws & Policies in the World's Wealthiest Countries Fail International Human Rights Standards (2021). U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3832989 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3832989

Claudia Flores (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Brian Citro

Independent ( email )

1815 W Argyle St, Apt 3C
Chicago, IL IL 60640
United States
2312154010 (Phone)

Nino Guruli

University of Illinois at Chicago - UIC John Marshall Law School ( email )

300 S. State Street
Chicago, IL 60604
United States

Hannah S. Abrahams

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Mariana Olaizola Rosenblat

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Chelsea Kehrer

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

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