The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias Against Women in the Treatment of Pain

16 Pages Posted: 27 Feb 2003  

Diane E. Hoffmann

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Anita J. Tarzian

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

In general, women report more severe levels of pain, more frequent incidences of pain, and pain of longer duration than men, but are nonetheless treated for pain less aggressively. The authors investigate this paradox from two perspectives: Do men and women in fact experience pain differently - whether biologically, cognitively, and/or emotionally? And regardless of the answer, what accounts for the differences in the pain treatment they receive, and what can we do to correct this situation?

Keywords: women, discrimination, health law, medical ethics, treatment

JEL Classification: I12, I18, K30

Suggested Citation

Hoffmann, Diane E. and Tarzian, Anita J., The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias Against Women in the Treatment of Pain (2001). Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Vol. 29, pp. 13-27, 2001. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=383803 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.383803

Diane E. Hoffmann (Contact Author)

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law ( email )

500 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1786
United States

Anita J. Tarzian

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law ( email )

500 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1786
United States

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