Are Bigger Banks Better? Firm-Level Evidence from Germany

75 Pages Posted: 10 May 2021 Last revised: 20 Jul 2021

See all articles by Kilian Huber

Kilian Huber

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business

Multiple version iconThere are 4 versions of this paper

Date Written: May 2021

Abstract

The effects of large banks on the real economy are theoretically ambiguous and politically controversial. I identify quasi-exogenous increases in bank size in postwar Germany. I show that firms did not grow faster after their relationship banks became bigger. In fact, opaque borrowers grew more slowly. The enlarged banks did not increase profits or efficiency, but worked with riskier borrowers. Bank managers benefited through higher salaries and media attention. The paper presents newly digitized microdata on German firms and their banks. Overall, the findings reveal that bigger banks do not always raise real growth and can actually harm some borrowers.

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Suggested Citation

Huber, Kilian, Are Bigger Banks Better? Firm-Level Evidence from Germany (May 2021). NBER Working Paper No. w28767, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3842742

Kilian Huber (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )

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