Social Networks and (Political) Assimilation in the Age of Mass Migration

40 Pages Posted: 24 May 2021

See all articles by Costanza Biavaschi

Costanza Biavaschi

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Corrado Giulietti

University of Southampton

Yves Zenou

Stockholm University; Monash University - Department of Economics; Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IUI); IZA Institute of Labor Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: May 22, 2021

Abstract

This paper investigates the pathways through which immigrant communities (social networks) influence individual naturalization. Specifically, we examine the impact that a fraction of naturalized co-ethnics, residing in the same block as a new immigrant in New York City in 1930, have on the probability of said immigrant becoming a U.S. citizen in 1940. Our results indicate that the concentration of naturalized co-ethnics residing in the block positively predicts individual naturalization and that this relationship operates through one main channel: information dissemination. Indeed, immigrants who live among naturalized co-ethnics are more likely to naturalize because they have greater access to critical information about the benefits and procedures of naturalization.

Keywords: Social networks, assimilation, naturalization, migration

JEL Classification: J61, J62, N32, Z1

Suggested Citation

Biavaschi, Costanza and Giulietti, Corrado and Zenou, Yves and Zenou, Yves, Social Networks and (Political) Assimilation in the Age of Mass Migration (May 22, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3851123 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3851123

Costanza Biavaschi

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) ( email )

H√łgskoleringen
Trondheim NO-7491, 7491
Norway

Corrado Giulietti

University of Southampton ( email )

Highfield
Southampton, SO17 1BJ
United Kingdom

Yves Zenou (Contact Author)

Monash University - Department of Economics ( email )

Australia

Stockholm University ( email )

Universitetsvägen 10
Stockholm, Stockholm SE-106 91
Sweden

Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IUI) ( email )

P.O. Box 5501
S-114 85 Stockholm
Sweden

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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