School Choice around the World and the Lessons We Can Learn

203 Pages Posted: 3 Jun 2021

See all articles by Christopher J. Counihan

Christopher J. Counihan

Newcastle University

Nick Cowen

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lincoln

Corey DeAngelis

Cato Institute

Pauline Dixon

University of Newcastle - School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences

Steve Humble

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Triin Lauri

Tallinn University (TLU)

Kaire Põder

Estonian Business School

M. Danish Shakeel

University of Buckingham

Patrick Wolf

University of Arkansas - Department of Education Reform

Toby Young

West London Free School

Date Written: July 4, 2019

Abstract

Education reforms that allow new educational providers to supply schooling into a state system can improve parental satisfaction and raise learning outcomes through consumer choice. Choice provides children with schooling that matches their interests. A child engaged in school is more likely to learn the civic values being taught and less likely to rebel against social order. When the state is unable to supply schooling, as in post-conflict settings where rebuilding to recover from the ravages of war takes precedence, other providers emerge to satisfy parental demands and choices. Parents from all socioeconomic backgrounds are capable of making informed choices using a range of methods to identify the schooling most appropriate for their children. Where government interventions are too rigidly imposed upon policies that target school reform, this can negate the benefits of school choice programmes. Unexpected school choice in post-Soviet Estonia offers a glimpse of how historical legacies can mitigate educational inequality. School choice can be initiated through top-down government reforms or through bottom-up approaches that are spontaneous and self-organised. School choice programmes yield many individual and societal benefits, especially for disadvantaged students. Empowering parents through school choice increases parental involvement and produces accountability. Education policies need to be informed by goldstandard research to ensure schooling reforms that make a difference to children’s lives

Keywords: education, education policy, schooling, school choice, schools, comparative analysis, government policy

JEL Classification: I20, I21, I24, I28, H52, D60, D63

Suggested Citation

Counihan, Christopher J. and Cowen, Nick and DeAngelis, Corey and Dixon, Pauline and Humble, Steve and Lauri, Triin and Põder, Kaire and Shakeel, M. Danish and Wolf, Patrick and Young, Toby, School Choice around the World and the Lessons We Can Learn (July 4, 2019). Institute of Economic Affairs, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3852634 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3852634

Christopher J. Counihan (Contact Author)

Newcastle University

Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
United Kingdom

Nick Cowen

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lincoln ( email )

Lincoln LN2
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://ulincoln.academia.edu/NickCowen

Corey DeAngelis

Cato Institute ( email )

1000 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20001-5403
United States

Pauline Dixon

University of Newcastle - School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences ( email )

Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU
United Kingdom

Steve Humble

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Triin Lauri

Tallinn University (TLU)

Uus-Sadama 5
Tallinn, DE 10120
Estonia

Kaire Põder

Estonian Business School

United States

M. Danish Shakeel

University of Buckingham ( email )

Buckingham
United Kingdom

Patrick Wolf

University of Arkansas - Department of Education Reform ( email )

201 Graduate Education Building
Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

Toby Young

West London Free School

Cambridge Grove
Hammersmith
London, W6 0LB
United Kingdom

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