Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Britain and Europe's Dysfunctional Relationship

350 Pages Posted: 3 Jun 2021

See all articles by Philip Booth

Philip Booth

City University London - Sir John Cass Business School

Martin Howe

Independent

Philippe Legrain

Independent

David G. Mayes

University of Auckland Business School (Deceased)

Patrick Minford

Cardiff University Business School; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Kristian Peter Niemietz

Institute of Economic Affairs

Gwythian Prins

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

Sean Rickard

Cranfield University

Martin Ricketts

University of Buckingham

J. R. Shackleton

Westminster Business School; Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA); University of Buckingham

Matthew Sinclair

Consultant

Christopher Snowdon

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)

Rachel Tingle

University of Buckingham

Roland Vaubel

University of Mannheim - Department of Economics

Richard Wellings

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)

Geoffrey Wood

Cass Business School

Date Written: April 18, 2016

Abstract

UK voters face an historic choice between remaining within the EU or leaving and seeking a different type of involvement in the world economy. Such an alternative is clearly possible: the UK has many advantages in an international context as a result of its historical alliances and involvement in international institutions. This book looks in detail at the arguments about the future of our relationship with Europe. As such, it informs the debate about whether the UK should remain in the EU or should leave. Furthermore, it examines the form a reshaped EU should take if a renegotiated Union was shaped by sound principles of economics and politically economy. In many areas, such as defence, environmental policy and some aspects of transport, some degree of international cooperation is desirable because of public good spillovers. However, such cooperation often involves cooperation beyond the EU, and this need not be directed by Brussels. Still less do such spillovers lead to the conclusion that we need ‘ever-closer union’ in Europe.

Keywords: Brexit, UK, EU, Britain, European Union, economic integration, macroeconomics, international trade, policy coordination, international organisations

JEL Classification: F02, F42, F45, F53, F55, F13

Suggested Citation

Booth, Philip and Howe, Martin and Legrain, Philippe and Mayes, David G. and Minford, Patrick and Niemietz, Kristian Peter and Prins, Gwythian and Rickard, S.H. and Ricketts, Martin and Shackleton, J. R. and Shackleton, J. R. and Sinclair, Matthew and Snowdon, Christopher and Tingle, Rachel and Vaubel, Roland and Wellings, Richard and Wood, Geoffrey E., Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Britain and Europe's Dysfunctional Relationship (April 18, 2016). Institute of Economic Affairs Monographs, Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3852731 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3852731

Philip Booth (Contact Author)

City University London - Sir John Cass Business School ( email )

106 Bunhill Row
London, EC1Y 8TZ
United Kingdom

Martin Howe

Independent

Philippe Legrain

Independent ( email )

David G. Mayes

University of Auckland Business School (Deceased)

12 Grafton Rd
Private Bag 92019
Auckland, 1010
New Zealand

Patrick Minford

Cardiff University Business School ( email )

Aberconway Building
Colum Drive
Cardiff, CF10 3EU
United Kingdom
+44 29 2087 5728 (Phone)
+44 29 2087 4419 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Kristian Peter Niemietz

Institute of Economic Affairs ( email )

2 Lord North Street, Westminster
London, SW1P 3LB
United Kingdom

Gwythian Prins

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics ( email )

United Kingdom

S.H. Rickard

Cranfield University ( email )

Cranfield
Cranfield School of Management
Bedfordshire MK43 OAL
United Kingdom

Martin Ricketts

University of Buckingham ( email )

Hunter Street
Buckingham MK18 1EG
United Kingdom

J. R. Shackleton

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)

2 Lord North Street, Westminster
London, SW1P 3LB
United Kingdom

Westminster Business School

35 Marylebone Road
London NW1 5LS
0207 911 5075 (Phone)

University of Buckingham

Hunter Street
Buckingham MK18 1EG
United Kingdom

Matthew Sinclair

Consultant ( email )

Christopher Snowdon

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) ( email )

2 Lord North Street, Westminster
London, SW1P 3LB
United Kingdom

Rachel Tingle

University of Buckingham

Hunter Street
Buckingham MK18 1EG
United Kingdom

Roland Vaubel

University of Mannheim - Department of Economics ( email )

D-68131 Mannheim
Germany

Richard Wellings

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) ( email )

2 Lord North Street
London SW1P 3LB
United Kingdom

Geoffrey E. Wood

Cass Business School ( email )

London, EC2Y 8HB
Great Britain
+44 0 20 7040 8740 (Phone)
+44 0 20 7040 8881 (Fax)

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