Human Capital and Inward FDI

27 Pages Posted: 14 Mar 2003

See all articles by Magnus Blomstrom

Magnus Blomstrom

Stockholm School of Economics - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), at New York; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Ari Kokko

Stockholm School of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: February 2003

Abstract

After a review of the literature, we conclude that there is potential for significant 'spillover effects' from FDI into host countries. We identify some limitations of this potential, however, to do with the stock of human capital, the interest in local firms of promoting skills transfer and the competition environment. We suggest comparing conditions and effects between regions, particularly between East Asia and Latin America, where transfer in the former has been more consistent than in the latter. We propose further that an analysis of the type of FDI flowing to different regions and countries could provide clues to the potential for maximizing the gains to local skills accumulation. Finally, studies are needed which examine the nature of skills provided by FDI, and ways in which training institutions, business schools, for example, can complement in-service training by firms in FDI host countries.

Keywords: MNCs, FDI, spillovers

JEL Classification: J23, O12

Suggested Citation

Blomstrom, Magnus and Kokko, Ari, Human Capital and Inward FDI (February 2003). CEPR Discussion Paper No. 3762. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=387900

Magnus Blomstrom (Contact Author)

Stockholm School of Economics - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 6501
Sveavagen 65
S-113 83 Stockholm
Sweden
+46 8 736 9265 (Phone)
+46 8 342 818 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), at New York

365 Fifth Avenue, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10016-4309
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Ari Kokko

Stockholm School of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 6501
Stockholm
Sweden
+46 8 736 9365 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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