Hidden Hunger: Understanding Dietary Adequacy in Urban and Rural Food Consumption in Senegal

IFPRI Discussion Paper 2036, July 2021

45 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2021

See all articles by Wim Marivoet

Wim Marivoet

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

John Ulimwengu

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Leysa M. Sall

AKADEMIYA2063

Adama Gueye

Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD)

Kimseyinga Savadogo

University Thomas Sankara

Khadim Dia

AKADEMIYA 2063

Date Written: July 27, 2021

Abstract

Using household consumption data collected in 2017/18, this paper analyzes patterns of urban and rural food consumption in Senegal. We adopt two methodological approaches. The first is an in-depth (spatial) analysis of current diets and corresponding nutrient intakes, coupled with an identification of possible food items to address nutrient gaps. The second approach is an application of the Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System (QUAIDS) model to examine food consumption dynamics of Senegalese households. Results show that Senegal is a typical case of micronutrient deficiency, especially regarding calcium, iron and vitamin B12. Reflected by their more diversified diet, nutrient intake of urban dwellers is generally better compared to their rural counterparts, which relates to the urban sector’s higher income status and more secure access to food items, especially those rich in calcium, vitamin B12 and vitamin A. In contrast, the dietary status of rural populations is usually poorer and mainly driven by the nutrient content of cereals locally produced. Despite insufficient domestic production, the recent promotion and upsurge of small (local) cereal processing units might be a promising development to increase urban uptakes of iron. Although Senegal’s food system overall is underperforming in terms of assuring a nutritious diet for all, the most remote rural departments of the country, such as Saraya and Podor, display the highest nutrient deficiencies and therefore should be targeted with priority. Apart from geographical targeting and given their higher responsiveness to price and income changes, policies based on food pricing and income transfers should be implemented to ensure a minimal nutrient intake among the most food-insecure households. These policies could be further complemented with behavioral change campaigns which promote an alternative set of nutrient-rich and cost-effective food items. At the same time, such campaigns should advocate against excessive or imbalanced intakes of sugar and fats, which are especially problematic in the more eastern located rural areas of the country and in the urban sector of various departments located in the western and central parts of Senegal, respectively.

Keywords: Senegal, West Africa, Africa South of Sahara; Africa, Food Consumption, Diet, Urban Areas, Rural Areas, Hunger, Demand, Elasticities

Suggested Citation

Marivoet, Wim and Ulimwengu, John and Sall, Leysa M. and Gueye, Adama and Savadogo, Kimseyinga and Dia, Khadim, Hidden Hunger: Understanding Dietary Adequacy in Urban and Rural Food Consumption in Senegal (July 27, 2021). IFPRI Discussion Paper 2036, July 2021, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3894452

Wim Marivoet (Contact Author)

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

John Ulimwengu

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Leysa M. Sall

AKADEMIYA2063 ( email )

Rwanda

Adama Gueye

Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) ( email )

Fann
Dakar
Senegal

Kimseyinga Savadogo

University Thomas Sankara ( email )

BV 30214
Ouagadougou
Burkina Faso

Khadim Dia

AKADEMIYA 2063 ( email )

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
6
Abstract Views
55
PlumX Metrics