Low-Skilled Labor Shortages Contribute to Forced Labor — Evidence from worker voice technologies

17 Pages Posted: 14 Sep 2021 Last revised: 10 Jan 2022

See all articles by Joann F. de Zegher

Joann F. de Zegher

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Management Science (MS)

Boyu Liu

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS)

Lisa Rende Taylor

Issara Institute

Mark Taylor

Issara Institute

Date Written: August 4, 2021

Abstract

Corporate efforts to end forced labor in global supply chains have focused more on mitigating business risk than on preventing harm. This research sheds new light on the potential of proactive market-based interventions to prevent labor exploitation. Leveraging 2018-2020 datasets on Myanmar-Thailand labor recruitment and worker-reported abuses, we find that an inability to efficiently alleviate unexpected labor shortages significantly worsens worker-reported abuses; an increase of one standard deviation in low-skilled labor shortages leads to a 34.5% or higher increase in worker-reported abuse in the following 2-4 weeks. Stressed labor markets are also simultaneously more prone to unexpected shortages and abuse. Reducing frictions in recruitment and strengthening worker reporting mechanisms that provide near-real-time information about workplace labor abuse, are important avenues to eliminating forced labor.

Suggested Citation

de Zegher, Joann F. and Liu, Boyu and Rende Taylor, Lisa and Taylor, Mark, Low-Skilled Labor Shortages Contribute to Forced Labor — Evidence from worker voice technologies (August 4, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3899489 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3899489

Joann F. De Zegher (Contact Author)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Management Science (MS) ( email )

United States

Boyu Liu

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS) ( email )

United States

Lisa Rende Taylor

Issara Institute ( email )

Palo Alto, CA

Mark Taylor

Issara Institute ( email )

Palo Alto, CA

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